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MOB02

ASSESSING THE SOCIETAL IMPACTS AND ACCEPTABILITY OF DELEGATED DRIVING

Driving delegation and connectivity

SUB-PROJECT THE PSYCHOLOGY BEHIND DELEGATED DRIVING

Challenges

Understanding how the driver interacts with a self-driving car in order to improve performance and safety when handing over control and boosting acceptability among the public.

Research themes

• Changes in the cognitive process when driving is delegated (awareness of the situation, attention and mental load, etc.)
• Monitoring the driver’s condition
• Impact of on-board tasks when taking back control in cases of varied usage.
• Acceptability and confidence in the self-driving vehicle

Project description

• Technical and technological progress make it possible to delegate driving to a computer in certain conditions. This new way of driving, or of being driven, creates new forms of human-machine interaction on the road in a dynamic and uncertain environment.
• There is the specific question of how the transition phases are handled (when handing over or taking back control), depending on the level of vehicle automation (SAE 3 & 4).
• Drivers’ attitudes and behaviour with regard to this new generation of vehicles need to be taken into account to ensure road safety at all times—on the motorway and in semi-urban or urban areas.

Future prospects

• In-depth work on cooperation between the driver and the vehicle
• Experiments in a “Wizard of Oz” type car controlled by an expert with unaccustomed drivers on the track then on the road.
• Analyses of the interactions between the self-driving car and other road users (pedestrians, riders on two wheels, conventional vehicles, etc.)
• Code of ethics covering the decision-making process of the self-driving vehicle during interactions with other users when faced with moral dilemmas.
• Learning and training in delegated driving

Partners involved

Partners involved THE PSYCHOLOGY BEHIND DELEGATED DRIVING

SUB-PROJECT TESTING AND APPROVAL

Challenges

Scenarios, test tracks and resources for the development and approval of self-driving vehicles.

Research themes

  • “Upstream” test tracks and resources at Satory, and “downstream” at Linas
  • Pre-regulations and initial shuttle tests
  • Innovative test materials: “Wizard of Oz” vehicle for delegated driving, connectivity tests, cyber-security tests, etc.

Project description

  • Monitoring work on benchmarking/regulations/normalisation/Euro NCAP for ADAS and self-driving vehicle tests
  • Coordinating the testing/approval working group for the NFI (Nouvelle France Industrielle) autonomous vehicle plan
  • Participation in the automated public transport working group
  • Production of the road map for the resources, test equipment and projects

Future prospects

  • “Upstream” test tracks and resources at Satory, and “downstream” at Linas-Monthlhéry (2016 and 2018)
  • Wizard of Oz car delivered in June 2016, test campaign in Q4 2016
  • Pre-regulation study and first shuttle tests in Q4 2016.
  • Projects and studies launched in January 2017 with the VEDECOM new three-year plan

Partners involved

Partners involved TESTING AND APPROVAL

SUB-PROJECT LEGAL ASPECTS OF DELEGATED DRIVING

Challenges

Determining the legal framework for the introduction of self-driving vehicles.

Research themes

  • Law on civil liability
  • Insurance law
  • Law on criminal liability
  • Personal data protection

Project description

From the legal viewpoint, the civil and criminal liability in the event of a road accident need to be determined. In France, this is not an issue because the ‘Badinter law’ compensates victims on the basis of a notion of involvement (even a stationary vehicle can be deemed as causing damage and that vehicle’s insurer will cover any compensation payments) and not by proving liability. However, once victims have been compensated, the insurer has to prove a vehicle failure in order to obtain reimbursement of the sums paid out to the victim from the party responsible (driver, software designer, etc.), so this raises the question of evidence of a vehicle failure or otherwise (problem of collecting data). In criminal law, however, at the current time it is the driver who is held liable, even with the latest amendment to the Vienna convention. This situation is less than satisfactory when the offence is committed when driving has been delegated, which is why we need to reflect upon the identification of the criminally liable party in such an event.

Future prospects

  • Identifying a system of liability so that victims can be compensated
  • Identifying the liable party in the event of an offence when driving is delegated
  • Providing a framework for the collection, compilation and storage of personal data

Partners involved

Partners involved LEGAL ASPECTS OF DELEGATED DRIVING